Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Humans are Responsible for Global Warming Essay -- environment, global

This essay offers a defense to the position that humans are responsible for global warming. What is Carbon Dioxide? Before attempting to answer any questions based on observations about carbon dioxide, taking a moment to identify the carbon dioxide helps to ensure a clear understanding of the element. According to Princeton University (n.d.), â€Å"carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide, is a heavy odorless colorless gas formed during respiration and by the decomposition of organic substances†. This naturally occurring element is exists in the Earth’s atmosphere where it circulates between water, plants, soil and animals. Current Carbon Dioxide Levels Knowledge of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere helps scientists understand how the gas affects Earth, its atmosphere and any potential global warming. Carbon dioxide levels, measured in parts per million (ppm), defines a unit of measure â€Å"as a measure of small levels of pollutants in air, water, body fluids, etc. Parts per million is the mass ratio between the pollutant component and the solution† (TET, n.d.). Rising every year since 1958, the current atmospheric carbon dioxide level is 396.81 ppm according to co2now.org (2014). Scientists believe that they only have a short amount of time to get this and other greenhouse gases under control before the planet crosses the point of no return. With a level of 396.81 ppm of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, one may wonder if this level is the highest level the Earth has seen in the last 450,000 years. According to the graph found at Planet Seed’s website (2014), this is the highest levels of carbon dioxide level recorded in that time. In fact, the graph clearly shows a spike in carbon dioxide levels in the last portion of the g... ...3). Overview of greenhouse gases. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/gases/co2.html Hilderman, R. (2011). Fossil fuel and atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. Retrieved from http://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/fossil-fuel-and-atmospheric-levels-of-carbon-dioxide.aspx Marshall, C. (2013). Small-scale U.S. lab experiment removes CO2 from atmosphere at relatively low cost. http://www.eenews.net/stories/1059981902 Planet Seed. (2014). Global climate change and energy CO2 and temperature change. Retrieved from http://www.planetseed.com/relatedarticle/co2-and-temperature-change Princeton University. (n.d.). WordNet search - 3.1. Retrieved from http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=co2 The Engineering Toolbox (TET). (n.d.). PPM - parts per million. Retrieved from http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ppm-d_1039.html

Monday, January 13, 2020

“A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne Essay

Throughout the years, humans have rewritten what true love means. The contemporary meaning of true love is the feeling of lightheartedness that one experiences when around another human. True love in Shakespeare and Donne’s time period, was a deep spiritual and emotional connection towards two humans. The connection never fades and grows stronger with separation. Many people believe that one can fall in and out of love; however, many poets wrote about a love that will never disappear. The love that they depicted regarded the truest of all loves. As beauty and time fades, true love will remain forever strong. William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116 is an extremely well-known poem for its description of true love. The love that the persona describes does not admit impediments and is unchanging and perfect. According to him, love acts like a guiding star for lost ships, not shaken in storms. Love will guide two people throughout their lives and will not fall apart in the stormy times. Shakespeare is completely certain that what he describes is true love to the point where he says that if his statements can be proved false, then he should have never written a single word and that no man has ever been in love. The ideal, romantic love outlasts even death and admits no flaw. Throughout the three quatrains, Shakespeare breaks down love into the simplest forms; in quatrain one, he states that love is not changeable; in  quatrain two, love is a like a fixed mark that guides ships throughout storms; and in the third quatrain, he says that love is not Time’s fool, stating that he is certai n that what he describes is true love. â€Å"It proposes a love which exists in an unchanging present, impervious to time’s millioned accidents† (Hammond 211). The start of the sonnet provides a definition of a love, which eventually excludes all action, identity, and knowledge (211). Shakespeare’s beginning lines of this sonnet are reminiscent of marriage vows that a couple repeats to one another during the service (212). â€Å"Alteration and remover are primarily words to describe infidelity† (213). The Day of Judgment is the only time in which love may cease to exist (Vendler 490). The young man, by mentioning these impediments, has announced  the strengthening of his own attachment to the listener, reinforcing the marriage of true minds. One must wonder how a marriage can last if it is not made of true love. Perhaps the persona realizes that God requires that each partner love the other, through sickness and health, forsaking others until death do each part. Those requirements can only be held onto in a marriage of true love. In another verse, titled A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne, a second persona describes how true love acts and is evident in daily life. Many historians believe that Donne wrote the poem for his wife, Anne Donne, before his departure in 1611, for France. The valediction is the guise in which the speaker attempts to persuade his lover to remain assured of his love while he is gone (Cavanaugh para. 2). He tries to define and rejoice in a love that transcends the physical realm, proving that their love can survive the separation (Bennett 178). The  separation of the lovers is like the separation that is caused by death. The physical bond that he shares with his wife will dissolve quietly like the soul of dying man (Bennett 179). Donne expresses his need for no tears and crying, believing that they should not reveal their sacred love. He asserts that if they would display their affections of their grief, their love would be defiled and would be no better than that love of ordinary people (182). â€Å"When disturbances happen between their love, if he leaves, it will be like the far-off trembling in the heavens and will be innocent and have no major bearing on their relationship† (Bennett 181). The love Donne describes is one that transcends the physical nature of relationships. Ordinary lovers are caught up in the physical presence of the other person; however the perfect love he enjoys does not need the presence of the physical body to survive (183). As speaker and his partner are connected at the soul, they will never be separated, even though their physical bodies might be. In the sixth stanza, Donne describes his love as pure and precious as gold. Their love can be stretched and expanded without damage, just as pure gold is malleable (185). Donne’s most famous comparison occurs in the seventh  stanza, where he compares his love to â€Å"stiff twin compasses.† Joan Bennett describes the compass as the following: The twin compasses are described as two only in the sense that there are two legs joined permanently at the top. One leg, â€Å"the fixed foot† is planted firmly in the center. The other â€Å"travels†, describing a perfect circle, returning to its point of origin. The â€Å"fixed foot† of the center foot â€Å"leans and harkens† after the other that â€Å"far doth roam†. The speaker explains that the center foot, the person who stays at home, makes sure the absent lover comes back to for a complete circle because of its firmness (para. 18). With the circle having no beginning or end, Donne describes what a perfect love is. No man has detailed love in such an unique way that grips at the hearts and souls of the readers. One only hopes to find the love that Donne has expressed. Throughout the two poems, love is shown to be much more than a physical attraction between two people. The attraction between two people can create lust, but a deep connection between two people creates a love in its truest of forms. True love could be likened to a pole to hold on to when a moment in time becomes too difficult. The steadfastness and stability of love are shown vividly throughout these two poems. The male speakers try to prove that love can exist in many forms, yet the one that will last forever is a â€Å"mind connection† that forever binds two people to one another. â€Å"A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning† shows how a love can survive by not being continually physical with one another. In the same way, Shakespeare’s Sonnet  116 describes the love between two people as more of a spiritual connection. Both speakers prove that love does not try to change the other person and will accept him as he is. Whether or not the authors were describing love in their lives, their two poems have made humans seek a deeper love with one another. Human nature begs for a connection that cannot be expressed in words. Love transcends time and space. The two poets described true love in almost the same way. The only difference was the direction that each took. Shakespeare compared true love mainly spiritually while Donne was  more metaphysical. Each person has different ideas regarding the qualities in love,  though most are described here in the poems. The connection described in the two poems is evident in marriages that last. Those couples that later spend over fifty blissful years together are those that married for a deep feeling of fulfillment than that of a physical need that was met. True love has become misunderstood in the past years. Shakespeare and Donne realized what it took to make a relationship work and what true love really is. True love stands the test of time and never changes. True love is what it was two hundred thousand years ago and will continue to be in years to come. Love is what makes humans live and co-exist. While Time changes people, love does not change. As an ever-fixed mark, love is always waiting for one to grab hold of and stand with in times of need. The two poems encapsulate what couples repeat in their marriage vows; love is here and will always be near by, and that one another should stand by their partner just as their love will always remain true. Works Cited Vendler, Helen. â€Å"Sonnet 116†. The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. London, England: The Belknap Press, 1998. Hammond, Gerald. The Reader and Shakespeare’s Young Man Sonnets. Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes and Noble Books, 1981. Cavanaugh, Cynthia A. â€Å"The Circle of Souls in John Donne’s A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning†. 18 Nov. 2002. . Bennett, Joan. â€Å"The Love Poetry of John Donne.† John Donne’s Poetry: Authoritative Texts Criticism. Ed. Arthur L. Clements. New York: New York: W.W Norton & Company, 1992. 178-194.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

How Should Bullying Be Stopped, And What Laws Are There...

How to Stop Bullying Bethany Holeman Political Science Core: Mandatory Writing Assignment Section 142.010 Stephen F. Austin State University Department of Government Fall 2014 Abstract How should bullying be stopped, and what laws are there against bullying? What is the impact of bullying? Bullying has been around for centuries. There are states with anti-bullying laws, but most do not implement the laws correctly. This major issue needs to be taken more seriously, and handled in the correct ways. Texas has a number of laws, or codes, to attend to the pandemic of bullying. There are many steps to take to insure the decline of bullying rates. Bullying has a negative impact on the lives of the victims. Introduction Feuds among individuals have been around forever. However, the term bully has been in existence since 1693. The term bully means â€Å"to affect by means of force or coercion† (Background on Bullying n.d.). Out of all the countries, the United States has the worst problem because bullying is legal in most states. Bullying was not viewed as a major issue until the early 1970’s. Although some states have anti-bullying laws, most do not address the major issues regarding the problem or any solutions as to how to stop bullying. â€Å"One in four students are bullied every month† (Background on Bullying n.d.), therefore forcing schools to have anti-bullying policies to make the students and parents feel safer overall. There are numerous differentShow MoreRelatedBullying Is The Main Reason People Bully Essay1377 Words   |  6 PagesBullying is one of the worst things you can go through. It is where someone who is insecure, jealous, or going through some thing or whatever is happening and call people names or hit them or just be rude and cruel to them because they think it’s funny but it’s not. Or it’s just to make people feel bad or make them feel insecure about themselves or want to change themselves in any way possible to fit in which is really sad that you think that you should change yourself just to fit in you should embraceRead MoreBullying : Abolish Negative Workplace Atmosphere1339 Words   |  6 PagesWorkplace Bullying: Abolish Negative Workplace Atmosphere Bullies are like chameleons. What they do and say may not always be visible, but their words and actions still impact another person’s life. Bullying does not stop once you graduate; however it continues on into the workplace. This must be stopped. Workplace bullying is inappropriate and it produces unbearable environments that lead to negative workplace atmospheres. The main people involved in the situation, the harmful and destructive effectsRead MoreBullying : The Worst Things You Can Go Through Essay1386 Words   |  6 Pages4 1 December 2016 Bullying Bullying is one of the worst things you can go through. It is where someone who is insecure, jealous, or going through something or whatever is happening and call people names or hit them or just be rude and cruel to them because they think it’s funny but it’s not. Or it’s just to make people feel bad or make them feel insecure about themselves or want to change themselves in any way possible to fit in which is really sad that you think that you should change yourself justRead MoreCyber Bullying : Should The United States Crack Down And Enforce Cyber Cyberbullying?1670 Words   |  7 PagesCyber bullying is an on-going issue that is terrorizing kids in almost every school district in the United States. Most of the states are trying to enforce it with a couple laws and restrictions but it won’t be that easy to get rid of something as big as cyber bullying has become. Should the United States crack down and enforce cyber bullying more? This issue has caused suicide and many other mental and physical problems with teens and even kids throughout the United States. People who areRead MoreSchool Anti Bullying Programs Are Not Effective Enough At Preventing Bullying1109 Words   |  5 PagesBullying is the unwanted aggressive discrimination that mostly happens in middle school. Children who get bullied are always bullied because of race, religion, physical disability or sexual orientation. Bullies mostly are children who are being abused at home or they are delinquent. School anti-bullying programs are getting expensive and schools are backing out. Some programs deliver the wrong idea for children. Most anti-bullying school programs are refusing to protect LGBT students who get bulliedRead MoreCyberbullying has sadly become an everyday thing for many teens all across the world. Just1100 Words   |  5 Pagesbegan to harass and bully her telling her that she should â€Å"drink bleach and die† (Newcomb). The bullying did not stop there, it only escalated from online verbal harassment to physical confrontations at school. On top of that, the girl allegedly bullied any of Rebecca’s friends and turned one of her closer friends against her. During this school year (2013-2014), Rebecca tried to start fresh by going to a new school only to find that the bullying would continue. Find no other way out, Rebecca SedwickRead MoreCyber Bullying : Bullying And Bullying1435 Words   |  6 Pagespowerful or intimidating.. Do you not know what you are doing to others though? Research studies show that, as of 2014, over half of young people report being cyber bullied. Everyday teenagers experience a form of cyberbullying, which can be defined as, the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threaten ing nature. Sounds a lot like harassment, does it not? All states across America should enforce laws and policies that do not tolerate cyberbullyingRead MoreCyberbullying through Social Media and the Internet1134 Words   |  4 Pagesdon’t realize that they can still get caught. Just like other types of bullying, many people notice it but never say anything and the victims never speak up about being bullied. The cyberbullying does not go unnoticed, however it usually goes unspoken about. Cyberbullying victims often feel trapped because it not only happens at school but it follows them home. They are often afraid to speak up against the person who is bullying them. This results in the victims having psychology problems and mayRead MoreIntroduction:. Many Studies Have Shown That Bullying Is1650 Words   |  7 PagesINTRODUCTION: Many studies have shown that bullying is the most common form of school violence (Nansen, Over peck, Pilla, Roan , Scheldt and Simon-Morton ,2001) and it may be a starting phase to a more severe forms of youth violence ( Leary , Kowalski ,Smith , Philips,2003). Bullying can be defined in terms of the power differentials (Olwens, 1993) that are between the victim and the perpetrator. According to Olwens, for bullying to set forth there should be imbalance of power as it doesn’t happenRead MoreEssay about Schools and Parents Must Be Held Accountable for Bullying1709 Words   |  7 Pages Bullying and cyber-bullying have increased tremendously in past six years. With the increased popularity of Facebook, bullies are finding a new way of tormenting victims. Suicide is the third leading cause of death in teens, with bullying being one of the leading causes. Legal standings on who is accountable have not been clear and when cases are brought forth the infrequent use of laws holding parents and schools responsible is glaring. It is time to make bigger strides on holding parents and school

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Aladdin And Orientalism A Little Bit Of The Middle East

Sonia Maryam IB English Ms.Rowe February 20 2015 Aladdin and Orientalism Could anyone have thought that the movie Aladdin had more to it than just showing a little bit of the Middle East? That is because the movie Aladdin shows Orientalism in many ways. Orientalism is a canonical text of cultural studies where Said has challenged the concept of Orientalism by: the difference between east and west, the start of European colonization the Europeans came in contact with the lesser developed countries of the east and found their civilization and culture very exotic and established the science of orientalism which was the study of the Orientals. The movie Aladdin was successful because it should a new way of using magic and a culture not many were aware of but unfortunately it was judged as being bad from being a Middle Eastern movie and now Aladdin had more to it than just showing a little bit of the Middle East and the way for having similar examples as Orientalism that is still presented in the Western society today. From the examples below it will be more clear and easier to understand how the Disney film Aladdin as being shaped by the forces of Orientalism, as outlined by Edward Said. The first example to support that I perceive the Disney film Aladdin as being shaped by the force of Orientalism, as outlined by Edward Said is by having stereotype of having an Arab accent and the differences between the east and west. One example from the movie Aladdin to

Friday, December 20, 2019

Louise Mallard a Complex Woman Essay - 739 Words

Louise Mallard: A Complex Woman In The Story of an Hour Kate Chopin introduces us to a woman living in the oppressive times of the nineteenth century, Louise Mallard. She appears to be an old lady with a bad heart who is blindly living in a bad marriage, like everyone else at the time. However, a closer look at Louise reveals a more complex woman: a spiritual and fragile, young woman who is aware of her incarcerating marriage. When I first began reading The Story of an Hour, my first impression of Louise was that she was an old woman with heart trouble. I was surprised in the eighth paragraph when Chopin tells us that she was young, with a fair, calm face (paragraph 8). We are informed that, even in her youth, Louise is†¦show more content†¦However, Louise is not oblivious to this, she is clearly aware of her marriage and her surroundings. We see this when Louise first hears the news about Brentlys death. Unlike most women who find themselves in denial after being told something of this magnitude, she wept at once, with sudden, wild abandonment, in her sisters arms (paragraph 3). Paragraph three also clarifies this by adding, She did not hear the story as many women have heard the same, with a paralyzed inability to accept its significance. Though Louise was different from most women in her reaction to Brentlys sudden death, she was indeed similar when considering the nature of her marriage. The w ords abandon and escape, in paragraph eleven, suggest that Louise was imprisoned by her marriage to Brently. Later she says, There would be no one to live for during those coming years. (paragraph 14). This statement relates to the nineteenth century myth that women have only one purpose; to live for their husbands alone and be treated as property. Chopin even goes as far to say that, There would be no powerful will sending her in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow creature. (paragraph 14). This shows that Louise was aware of the situation in her marriage. Though religion is never mentioned, we can assumeShow MoreRelatedKate Chopin s The Story Of An Hour980 Words   |  4 PagesA bird would always want to fly even from its golden cage; so does a person confined to a house and a loveless marriage. In â€Å"The Story of an Hour,† Mrs. Mallard is a woman trapped in her own golden cage. Throughout the story, the author, Kate Chopin, shows the true colors of matrimony during that time and what it meant in women’s lives. Women were the only possessions attained after marriage, designated to do house labors and take care of a husband and children. â€Å"The Story of an Hour† by Kate ChopinRead MoreStory Of An Hour Critical Analysis1083 Words   |  5 Pagesself-consciousness begins. Louise Mallard, wife of Richard Mallard, a successful businessman. Louise Mallard is a woman ahead of her time, by the standards of the 1890’s she should be happy. Her husband loves her; she herself acknowledges that he â€Å"had nev er looked save with love upon her.†(Chopin, p.477) In the 1890’s women depended on their husbands financially. There was an unspoken rule that the man was the powerful one, the wife would conform to the husband. A woman in this era lived a very restrictedRead MoreSymbolism as Found in Kate Chopins Story of an Hour Essay1532 Words   |  7 PagesSymbolism as found in Kate Chopin’s â€Å"Story of an Hour† In Kate Chopin’s â€Å"Story of an Hour† the protagonist, Louise Mallard, is going through a life-changing event that is brought on by the news of the death of her husband, Brently Mallard. During this hour, she is told of her husband’s death, grieves for a short time, discovers that she will now be able to â€Å"live for herself† (16) and is finally able to free herself of the restrictive marriage she has been living in. The end of her last hour comesRead MoreEssay on Compare and Contrast1201 Words   |  5 Pagesgoing through ones heart, but in this case the feeling of loss can turn into someones freedom. For Louise Mallard she had an erratic reaction when she was informed that her husband had been allegedly killed in a train accident. She locks herself in her room and sits in front of the window in desolation. She begins to ponder how her life will be without her husband. The sorrow that Mrs. Mallard felt in the beginning slowly turns into joy. â€Å"Free body and soul free!† (Chopin 40). She knew thatRead MoreAn Analysis Of Kate Chopin s Chopin 1690 Words   |  7 Pagesclaim. In â€Å"The Story of an Hour†, the main character Louise Mallard goes through a spectrum of emotions after she is told that her husband has passed away in an accident. Once she is alone in her room Louise seems terrified of the overwhelming sensation that she feels is slowly taking over her, which Louise realizes later on is her newfound freedom. Even though Louise and her husband truly loved each other and she does feel upset over his death, Louise also feels as if she has been liberated and is trulyRead MoreEssay on Freedom in Kate Chopins The Story of An Hour1087 Words   |  5 Pagesthoughts and feelings can be realized. Mrs. Louise Mallard, the victim and messenger of this story, is the representation of such a person. Her relationship with her husband is so tyrannical and limiting that even death is considered a reasonable means of escape. The condition of life for Mrs. Mallard is terrible, yet for some reason she doesnt seem to come to full realization until her husbands death. This leads one to believe it was commonplace for a woman to be unhappy in her marriage and haveRead MoreCritical Analysis Of The Movie Hunger Games1291 Words   |  6 Pagessee who’s the strongest. The story of an Hour is a short story that describes the series of emotions Louise Mallard endures after hearing of the death of her husband, Brently, who was reported to have died in a railroad accident. Mrs. Mallard suffers from heart problems. Therefore, her sister and her husbands friend, Richard, attempt to inform her of the news in a gentle way. At the end, Louise dies because of the news. Look what you made me do is a music video by Taylor Swift where she tells theRead More The Dilemma of Women Essay1817 Words   |  8 Pagestheir lives. She felt strongly about feminism and wanted women to be liberated from the de pendence of men. By looking at Chopin’s stories we can see how the characters longed to be strong and independent women. In â€Å"The Story of an Hour†, when Mrs. Mallard hears of her husbands death she feels liberated and is described as: When she abandoned herself a little whispered word escaped her slightly parted lips. She said it over and over under her breath: ‘free, free, free!’ The vacant stare and the lookRead More Patriarchal Society and the Feminine Self in Kate Chopins Story of an Hour1764 Words   |  8 Pagesincipient awakening of Mrs. Mallard, and thus exploring the possibility of feminine identity, even while, ultimately, denying the fruition of such an experience.   Like all of her works, this short story reacts to a specific historical framework, the Cult of True Womanhood, in its indictment of patriarchal culture.   As Barbara Welter notes, in the nineteenth century, â€Å"a women judged herself and was judged by her husband, her neighbors, and society† by the attributes of a True Woman which included, especiallyRead MoreKate Chopin s The Story Of An Hour1309 Words   |  6 Pagesmessages through the manner of a marriage. In her short stories â€Å"The Story of an Hour† and â€Å"Desiree s Baby† she showed just how different marriages could be as well as how similar they can be. Chopin portrays the lives of the main characters, Louise Mallard from â€Å"The Story of An Hour† and Desiree Aubigny from â€Å"Desiree’s Baby† and what led to their downfalls. These two heroines are completely different from each other but face the same issue; their marriages are killing them. In this paper I am going

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

International Trade and Trade Restrictions free essay sample

Trade restrictions can be in the form of tariffs, which are taxes on imports; quotas, which are limits on the quantity of a particular good that can be imported or exported; or other trade restrictions. International trade efficiencies, trade restrictions, and the consequences of these restrictions will be discussed further. World trade offers many advantages to the trading countries: access to markets around the world, lower cost through economies of scale, the opportunity to utilize abundant resources, better access to information about markets and technology, improved quality honed by competitive pressure, and lower prices for consumers (McEachern, 2012, p. 733). Comparative advantage, specialization, and trade allow people to use their scarce resources most efficiently to satisfy their unlimited wants. Comparative Advantage is the ability to make something at a lower opportunity cost than other producers face (McEachern, 2012, p. 32). The ability to make a good at a lower opportunity cost gives that individual, firm, region, or country a comparative advantage. Even if a country has absolute advantage in all goods, they should specialize in producing the goods in which it has a comparative advantage. If each country specializes and trades according to the law of comparative advantage, everyone would benefit from greater consumption possibilities. McEachern provides three reasons for international specialization: countries having different resource endowments, greater economies of scale can be achieved when firms participate in international trade, and tastes differ from country to country (McEachern, 2013, p. 719-720). Every country has a comparative advantage in the production of some products. This means that the labor and capital resources available in the reason are more productive when focused towards a particular industry and thus are able to be produce that product better as a result. In the case of the textile industry, Pakistan enjoys a comparative advantage as it has many cotton fields, providing it direct access to the raw material for the industry. It further has been operating in that industry for a long time that has spawned a lot of trained workforce relating to that industry in the country. Therefore, law of comparative advantage dictates that it should produce textile materials. The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the only global international organization dealing with the rules of trade between nations (WTO, 2012). Their goal is to help producers of goods and services, exporters, and importers conduct their business. The WTO and agreements such as NAFTA open up free trade, allowing goods to move freely and thereby aiding consumers in various countries in terms of prices and quality. It also spawns healthy competition in the local industries. Trade restrictions can lead to a breakdown in competition and can lead to adverse effects in the local and international market. Restrictions can benefit certain domestic producers that lobby their government for benefits. Congress tends to support the group that fights back, so trade restrictions often persist, despite the clear and widespread gains from freer trade. For example, U. S. growers of sugar cane have been protected from imports, which results in an increase in U. S. sugar prices. Higher prices hurt domestic consumers, but they are usually unaware. As McEachern states, â€Å"Consumers remain largely oblivious. † Who is responsible for trade ethics? Government might be the initial answer but all constituents involved should be aware and be transparent. An example is Nike, Inc. They provid a statement in understanding how to change the way an industry views its labor force. It does not happy by monitoring factories alone. Monitoring reveals the issues, issues that in turn are locked into a complex web of root causes. The ability to address these root causes should be shared by many, owned by no single constituent (Nike, Inc. , 2013, p. 1). One of their strategies is to transform working relationships with their contracted factories to incentivize change that will benefit workers. Are trade restrictions effective? Trade protection can foster inefficiencies. The immediate cost of such restrictions includes not only the welfare loss from higher domestic prices but also the cost of resources used by domestic producer groups to secure the favored protection (McEachern, 2012, p. 732). These costs may become permanent if the industry never realizes the economies of scale and never becomes competitive. Protecting one stage of production usually requires protecting downstream stages of production as well. The biggest problem with imposing trade restrictions are that other countries usually retaliate which shrinks the gains from trade. Some experts believe the costs of protecting the jobs of workers in vulnerable industries, which are ultimately borne by taxpayers or consumers, far exceed the potential cost of retraining and finding new jobs for those workers (Globalization 101, 202, para. 1). In addition, that it may not promote firms and industries to make necessary changes to challenge foreign competition and find efficiencies to which then would make them become even more dependent on government protection. As international trade has increased, conflicts over trade have also increased. Trade restrictions may continue to be very political in nature. The more companies like Nike and consumers start being more aware of ethical behavior around international trade, the more everyone will benefit. The U. S. government does take responsibility for workers who lose their jobs by international trade and have programs established to assist in training and support to re-employ those workers. As countries specialize and trade according to the law of comparative advantage, consumers should also benefit from efficient production and cheaper prices. The increase of technology may have an impact that will increase the speed at which international trade and efficiencies happen. References McEachern, W. A. (2012). Economics, 9e (9th ed). Mason, OH: South-Western. Globalization 101 (2013). The Levin Insitute. Consequences of trade restrictions. thttp://www. globalization101. org/consequences-of-trade-restrictions/ Nike, Inc. (2013). Responsibility. Targets and performance. http://www. nikeresponsibility. com/report/content/chapter/targets-and-performance#Labor World Trade Organization (2013). http://www. wto. org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/whatis_e. htm

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

King Arthur And Merlin Essay Example For Students

King Arthur And Merlin Essay Merlin is a popular character when it comes to the stories of King Arthur andother stories dealing with the Arthurian age. In most of the stories writtenabout him they refer to him as the magician, kingmaker, and prophet. We alsoknow him as the one that takes care of Arthur from birth, who set him on thethrone, who established him there in the early days of his reign as king. Whilemost books agree that he knew King Arthur and watched over him from birth, whatwas he really, was he a magician with a beard in a tall pointed hat and longcloak with a magic wand that performed magic or was he a prophet that could forsee the future as portrayed in the Crystal Cave or was he something else. In the Crystal Cave Merlin is portrayed as a prophet that can see into thefuture with the help of the pattern of crystals in the cave that he discovered. Here he is not portrayed as a magician but rather it shows us his technicalabilities, like when he moved Hele Stone of Stonehenge with the machine hebuilt, rather then raising the whole stone or causing it to fly through the airor float across the sea. He is then portrayed as the kingmaker when at theend he is given Arthur to raise and teach so he would be ready to take over thethrown when he got older. Merlin may also be known as a lover LastEnchantment, when while under Arthurs rule, Merlin retires to thewilderness and there is attacked y a subtle poison given to him by Morgause, heis later nursed back to health by a young girl named Ninian. After that Ninianbecomes Merlins pupil until in the end when his powers begin to fade and shetakes over the role of guardian of Arthurs realm. Merlins morepassionate side is also showed in a book written by James Branch Cabell. In thebook titled Something About Eve Merlin is summoned along with King Solomonand Odysseus to give an account of him self before the passes ?into the realmsof the otherworld to discover the true meaning of his life, here Merlinconfesses that he was happy for a long time in his tower, until he saw hispeople of the Arthurian age begin to break each other and to become filled withhate and lust and barbarity. But even then he lingers on, happy with his childlove and peace of his tower, only now does he seek enlightenment in theOtherworld, where he might find failure of his dream.(Stewart, 96) Merlin forwhatever reason does not cease to be concerned with this world and the peoplewho live in it. Merlins love of women, sometimes moralized into a sexualweakness, is a reflection of his otherworldly fathers love for his mother. This in turn relates to one of the most ancient mythical themes, and like allMerlinic lore is intimately concerned with both environment and the spiritualintimations found in all religions, magic, and mysticism. Thus the varioussexual convolutions of Merlin in the modern fiction are not merelymisunderstandings of the source of material but are explorations of a universaltheme expressed through the mediating figure of Merlin. Merlin is also seen as ateacher, like in Parke Godwins Firelord. Here Merlin is in a senseArthurs own inner self, able to show him a vision of the future, of the greatking and warrior whose presence draws the very utmost effort from the men whofollow him, the man that Arthur is to become, driven by the Merlin within. InT.H. Whites The Sword in the Stone Merlin teaches by example, turningArthur into animal, fish, or bird. Doing so he learns many things, from hisencounter with a great pike that lives beneath the walls of hisfoster-fathers castle, he learns that pow er for its own sake leads nowhere. Arthur as a bird discovers that boundaries are an illusion fought over withoutreason. All that he learns allows him to portray his good character as he pullsthe sword from the stone that made him king. Him being a teacher is also seen inthe Crystal Cave when he is given Arthur at birth to teach because he didnot have a father that wanted him, and so his mother thought that giving thechild to Merlin would be the wisest thing to do. In Catherine Christians TheSword and the Flame it has Merlin arranging for Arthur to acquire his second,more famous sword, Excalibur. Instead of him receiving the sword from the Ladyof the Lake, Merlin assists in its forging by an ancient Smith God from a lumpof meteorite. That the shaping of King or sword may extend beyond a singlelifetime is shown in those versions of the story where Merlin or Arthur comeagain, after a long sleep, in Avalon or the Hawthorn Tower, to continue the workleft unfinished at the end of the Arthurian Age. (Stewart, 99) When writi ngabout Merlin there are three aspect that authors look into, the bright youth,the mad prophet and shaman, and the wise elder. All three are concerned with theinteraction of spiritual and magical powers, with a strong emphasis in the worksof John Cowper-Powys and C.S. Lewis. Merlin born of a moral mother and anotherworld spirit according to the chronicles acts as the mediator for deeppowers manifesting through the land into human consciousness. His threefoldappearance is initially that of the lifetime of any person, youth, adulthood,maturity, but into each of these aspects is channeled the most potent dynamicpower, imagery, and mystery of each life phase. As a youth, he is the eternalchild, of spiritual purity, as a mature man he is the wild fervent power ofmagic or transforming consciousness, as an elder he is the epitome of wisdom,learning, transcendent knowledge, and experience. In fictional worksunconnected to one another, this coherence out of diversity is apparent andoccasion ally the deep ancient god-form appears, the non-human power behind thesemi-human Merlin. This power may also take a number of shapes. But what isremarkable is that authors of quite different style, cultural background andquality of work may be imaginatively aware of its existence. There is nochronicle source for Merlin as a god or titanic power, only a few hints in earlyWelsh poetry. Later romances and chronicles were divided between the magician ofArthurs court and the increasingly orthodox image of a diabolical being,though there is no mention of Merlin linked to Arthur in the early sources, andcertainly no question of evil.(Stewart, 82) Merlin has remained dark andmysterious despite everything. Yet somehow, none of those who have chosen towrite about him have been able to resist asking the question of whom or what heis. Answers they have come up with are different from author to author,picturing him as god or jester, as a prophet, wiseman, as an old lover as analien being brought to earth on cosmic business, as a wondrous child or as acharlatan and a liar and a madman. But always, between the disguises, we glimpseanother face, that of an old pilgrim and wanderer, sent here long ago to guideand guard the destiny of kings and of men. We perhaps know Merlin best in hismost familiar appearance, him being the wise and foresighted wizard who standsbehind Arthur in the early days of his reign who acts as advisor and councilorto the young king until he himself is ensnared by a beautiful young woman whobecomes his apprentice. The different aspects of Merlin Merlin is a popularcharacter when it comes to the stories of King Arthur and other stories dealingwith the Arthurian age. In most of the stories written about him they refer tohim as the magician, kingmaker, and prophet. We also know him as the one thattakes care of Arthur from birth, who set him on the throne, who established himthere in the early days of his reign as king. While most books agree that heknew Kin g Arthur and watched over him from birth, what was he really, was he amagician with a beard in a tall pointed hat and long cloak with a magic wandthat performed magic or was he a prophet that could for see the future asportrayed in the Crystal Cave or was he something else. In the CrystalCave Merlin is portrayed as a prophet that can see into the future with thehelp of the pattern of crystals in the cave that he discovered. Here he is notportrayed as a magician but rather it shows us his technical abilities, likewhen he moved Hele Stone of Stonehenge with the machine he built, ratherthen raising the whole stone or causing it to fly through the air or floatacross the sea. He is then portrayed as the kingmaker when at the end heis given Arthur to raise and teach so he would be ready to take over the thrownwhen he got older. Merlin may also be known as a lover Last Enchantment,when while under Arthurs rule, Merlin retires to the wilderness and there isattacked y a subtle poison given t o him by Morgause, he is later nursed back tohealth by a young girl named Ninian. After that Ninian becomes Merlins pupiluntil in the end when his powers begin to fade and she takes over the role ofguardian of Arthurs realm. Merlins more passionate side is also showedin a book written by James Branch Cabell. In the book titled Something AboutEve Merlin is summoned along with King Solomon and Odysseus to give anaccount of himself before the passes ?into the realms of the otherworld todiscover the true meaning of his life, here Merlin confesses that he was happyfor a long time in his tower, until he saw his people of the Arthurian age beginto break each other and to become filled with hate and lust and barbarity. Buteven then he lingers on, happy with his child love and peace of his tower, onlynow does he seek enlightenment in the Otherworld, where he might find failure ofhis dream.(Stewart, 96) Merlin for whatever reason does not cease to beconcerned with this world and the people wh o live in it. Merlins love ofwomen, sometimes moralized into a sexual weakness, is a reflection of hisotherworldly fathers love for his mother. This in turn relates to one of themost ancient mythical themes, and like all Merlinic lore is intimately concernedwith both environment and the spiritual intimations found in all religions,magic, and mysticism. Thus the various sexual convolutions of Merlin in themodern fiction are not merely misunderstandings of the source of material butare explorations of a universal theme expressed through the mediating figure ofMerlin. Merlin is also seen as a teacher, like in Parke Godwins Firelord. Ap Language And Composition Scarlet Letter EssayHere Merlin is in a sense Arthurs own inner self, able to show him a visionof the future, of the great king and warrior whose presence draws the veryutmost effort from the men who follow him, the man that Arthur is to become,driven by the Merlin within. In T.H. Whites The Sword in the StoneMerlin teaches by example, turning Arthur into animal, fish, or bird. Doing sohe learns many things, from his encounter with a great pike that lives beneaththe walls of his foster-fathers castle, he learns that power for its own sakeleads nowhere. Arthur as a bird discovers that boundaries are an illusion foughtover without reason. All that he learns allows him to portray his good characteras he pulls the sword from the stone that made him king. Him being a teacher isalso seen in the Crystal Cave when he is given Arthur at birth to teachbecause he did not have a father that wanted him, and so his mother thought thatgiving the child to Merlin would b e the wisest thing to do. In CatherineChristians The Sword and the Flame it has Merlin arranging for Arthur toacquire his second, more famous sword, Excalibur. Instead of him receiving thesword from the Lady of the Lake, Merlin assists in its forging by an ancientSmith God from a lump of meteorite. That the shaping of King or sword mayextend beyond a single lifetime is shown in those versions of the story whereMerlin or Arthur come again, after a long sleep, in Avalon or the HawthornTower, to continue the work left unfinished at the end of the Arthurian Age.(Stewart, 99) When writing about Merlin there are three aspect that authorslook into, the bright youth, the mad prophet and shaman, and the wise elder. Allthree are concerned with the interaction of spiritual and magical powers, with astrong emphasis in the works of John Cowper-Powys and C.S. Lewis. Merlin born ofa moral mother and an otherworld spirit according to the chronicles acts as themediator for deep powers manifesting th rough the land into human consciousness. His threefold appearance is initially that of the lifetime of any person, youth,adulthood, maturity, but into each of these aspects is channeled the most potentdynamic power, imagery, and mystery of each life phase. As a youth, he is theeternal child, of spiritual purity, as a mature man he is the wild fervent powerof magic or transforming consciousness, as an elder he is the epitome of wisdom,learning, transcendent knowledge, and experience. In fictional worksunconnected to one another, this coherence out of diversity is apparent andoccasionally the deep ancient god-form appears, the non-human power behind thesemi-human Merlin. This power may also take a number of shapes. But what isremarkable is that authors of quite different style, cultural background andquality of work may be imaginatively aware of its existence. There is nochronicle source for Merlin as a god or titanic power, only a few hints in earlyWelsh poetry. Later romances and chronicles were divided between the magicia n ofArthurs court and the increasingly orthodox image of a diabolical being,though there is no mention of Merlin linked to Arthur in the early sources, andcertainly no question of evil.(Stewart, 82) Merlin has remained dark andmysterious despite everything. Yet somehow, none of those who have chosen towrite about him have been able to resist asking the question of whom or what heis. Answers they have come up with are different from author to author,picturing him as god or jester, as a prophet, wiseman, as an old lover as analien being brought to earth on cosmic business, as a wondrous child or as acharlatan and a liar and a madman. But always, between the disguises, we glimpseanother face, that of an old pilgrim and wanderer, sent here long ago to guideand guard the destiny of kings and of men. We perhaps know Merlin best in hismost familiar appearance, him being the wise and foresighted wizard who standsbehind Arthur in the early days of his reign who acts as advisor and councilort o the young king until he himself is ensnared by a beautiful young woman whobecomes his apprentice.